Author guidelines

All submissions must adhere to the specific guidelines that apply to each type of article being submitted and to general guidelines where applicable.

General Guidelines

Manuscript Formatting
Citation Formatting
Table Formatting
Figures and Illustrations
Figure Legends

Articles Types and Guidelines

Research Articles
Systematic Reviews
Narrative Review
Case Reports
Research Letters
Commentary
Letters to the Editor
Crossroads
Book and Event Reviews
Fine Arts

General Guidelines

Manuscript Formatting

Manuscripts must be submitted in Microsoft Word (.doc/.docx) format and be written in English. Text should be double-spaced with 12-point Arial font, in 8.5″x11″ format, with 1″ margins and continuous line numbers (select under page layout).

Please do not include tables and figures in this document as they must be uploaded separately as a supplemental file.

Please do not include authors’ names, information or acknowledgements in your original manuscript or in your supplemental files as this information must be entered separately during online submission and would interfere with the blinded peer-review process.

Citation Formatting

All citations must be in Vancouver style.

Table Formatting

Tables, no more than 4, must be submitted typewritten. Each table must be constructed as simply as possible. Number tables consecutively with arabic numerals in the order of their first citation in the text and supply a brief title for each. Tables must be in text format (.doc, .xls) and not image format, allowing for copyediting and formatting by the journal.

Figures and illustrations

No more than 4 high resolution figures may accompany a manuscript with the following specification:

  • For line art (graphs, charts, scatterplots, flowcharts or anything else with sharply delineated lines) in Ai/EPS/PPT, 800 DPI minimum
  • For Continuous-tone art (photographs, immunoblots, microphotographs, or anything with soft edges gradually shading from one tone to another) in TIFF/JPG/PNG format, 300 DPI minimum

Figure Legends

Figure legends should contain sufficient information so that each figure is intelligible without reference to the text. These should be numbered with Arabic numerals in the order of their appearance within the text. Supply a brief title for each.

Article Types and Guidelines

Research Articles

Quality original research related to medicine and health, basic science, clinical and epidemiological studies, economic analyses in health, medical education, medical arts or any other primary medical research of interest to a broad audience. Students are encouraged to submit undergraduate theses, summer projects, or honours research projects.

The manuscript (excluding references) should not exceed 3500 words, and should be divided into its appropriate components: abstract and keywords; introduction; methods; results; discussion; acknowledgements; references. References should not exceed 50 in number. Figures must be submitted as separate files. Each figure should begin on a new and numbered page, in the following sequence: figure, figure title, and figure legend.

Abstract: The abstract should be no more than 250 words and should contain the following: the purpose of the study, methods, main findings, and principal conclusions. The abstract must be self-contained.

Keywords: Below the abstract provide 3 to 10 keywords that describe the content of the article. If possible, use medical subject headings (MeSH) of Index Medicus, National Library of Medicine, USA.

Introduction: State clearly the purpose of the article, summarize the rationale for the study or observation, and give pertinent references. Do not include data or conclusions from the work being reported.

Methods: Describe your selection of the observational or experimental subjects clearly (patients or experimental animals, including controls). Describe the experimental design, the methods, the apparatus (manufacturer’s name and address in parentheses), and procedures in sufficient detail to allow other workers to reproduce the study. Give references to established methods, including statistical methods; describe new or substantially modified methods, give reasons for using them, and evaluate their limitations. Identify precisely all drugs and chemicals used, including generic name(s), dose(s), and route(s) of administration. Studies using human subjects must be conducted in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki of 1975. In all experiments, it should be documented that informed consent was obtained from the subjects. Do not use patients’ names, initials, or hospital numbers. All studies involving the use of animals must be conducted in accordance with the highest standards of humane animal care, and in accordance with the institution’s internal regulations.

Results: Present your results in a logical sequence in the text, tables, and illustrations. Do not repeat in the text all the data in the tables or illustrations; emphasize or summarize only important observations.

Discussion: The discussion should focus on the interpretation and significance of the findings. State the implications of the findings and their limitations, including possibilities for future research. Relate the observations to other relevant studies.

Acknowledgements: One or more statements should acknowledge (i) contributions that do not justify authorship; (ii) technical help; (iii) financial and material support.

Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis

Systematic reviews and meta-analysis generate evidence by giving a scientific synthesis of primary research adressing a specific question and using reproducible methodologies. These articles must meet all criteria for a research publication,  including sections with clear objectives, describing methods of data collection and analysis.

Narrative Reviews

Narrative reviews are evaluations that add new subjective perspective to a given body of research. Reviews that relate to topics of current interest are favoured by the MJM.  Appropriate topics for review articles are those surrounding basic and clinical medical science. Articles concerning other areas of medicine such as the humanities may be appropriate if they are of a scientific and/or experimental nature. Other articles are welcome but may be more suited for the “Crossroads” section of the MJM.

Narrative reviews must follow the same format as original articles, except the structure will be left to the author’s discretion. The word count should not exceed 3500 words.

Case Reports

Case reports should document a single interesting case that would provide important learning points for students in medical fields. Please use the following specific format:

Introduction: Use one paragraph to briefly describe the salient clinical features of the disease being addressed (e.g. epidemiological background of the disease, unique presentations/signs/symptoms).

The Case: Presentation of the case should include pertinent information according to the format of a typical case report . This includes the chief/presenting complaint, the pertinent history, medications, habits, allergies, history of present illness, family history, personal history, systems review, clinical examination, laboratory investigations, and other diagnostic tests or studies performed (e.g. radiology, biopsy, etc.).

Discussion: Discussion of the case should seek to enlighten the reader about the approaches used toward the clinical scenario presented, to highlight recent advancements in the field of diagnosis and treatment of the condition, and to generally include points of clinical learning.

Acknowledgements, References, Illustrations: These should follow the format and limitations listed under “Original Article”.

Ethics: Consent for publication of a case report in print or electronically must be obtained from the patient or, if this is not possible, the next of kin before submission. Please use generic drug names wherever possible.

Research Letters

Brief scientific communication that presents original data in an intermediate fashion between an abstract and an article. The research letter is an appropriate, self-sufficient format to present concise research data in cases where the amount of data or discussion and conclusions driven from the results are not sufficient to fulfill an article. It must contain the usual sections in scientific papers (introduction, methods, results, discussion, summary and conclusions), and a short number of selected references. Within this general structure, the writing style can be flexible. A maximum of 800 words (not including references), three figures (formatted as described in the specific guidelines for original articles), and seven references are permitted.

Commentary

Commentaries are pieces that are intended to contextualize research in health and medicine and present sound arguments for an issue, policy, intervention, or agenda supporting a specific point of view. These pieces are limited to 1500 words, and can contain a maximum of 10 references.

Letters to the Editor

We publish responses from all members of the public to articles published by the MJM and communications on other topics that are pertinent to health and medicine. Communications do not require citations, but must be concise, and contained in 400 words or less. Letters must not violate the rights of any member of the public, nor contain abusive language. Publication of letters will be at the discretion of editorial board. Letters will be published without editing of content, but correction for typological errors.

Crossroads

We publish articles focused on exploring the relationship between medicine, social sciences (sociology, political science, anthropology, law, etc.) and humanities (literature, history, philosophy, visual arts, etc.). The intent of this section is to explore and promote thinking about medicine beyond a scientific and biomedical perspective. The formatting of these articles must adhere to the general guidelines for citations, tables and figures, and the wordcount may not exceed 3500, but the content and organization is at the discretion of authors.  We welcome articles that are reflective, explore relationships, and contextualize health and medicine at the level of persons and/or society.

Book and Event Reviews

We publish reviews of books, exhibitions and events that are timely and relevant to the topics of health and medicine. Reviews mus be less than 700 words. We encourage submitters to contact us prior to writing to ensure that the piece is relevant to the journal, although this will not guarantee acceptance.

Fine Arts

All materials submitted to us must be original work and relevant to health and medicine. All submissions must be in high resolution digital format and adhering to the general guidelines. Artwork can include illustrations, paintings, photography or other fine arts mediums. For photography that features individuals, submitter must certify that verbal or written consent was obtained from subjects, and their dignity and right to privacy was respected. For photography that features copyrighted artworks, authors must certify that they have permission to submit a reproduction. Exceptions apply to works reproduced under fair use or under creative commons licensing, copyrighted works in displayed in public.